49 Days of Jewish Spiritual Practice

The Omer comprises 49 days, paralleling the wandering of the Israelites in the wilderness, which in Torah comes the day after Passover begins, and ends with receiving Torah on Shavuot.

Originally, the omer was the measure of wheat brought as a donation of harvest gratitude to feed the Temple workers in ancient Israel. As our need for renewal of spirit builds in these troubling times, the Jewish spiritual renaissance continues unabated.

Kabbalists have developed a powerful spiritual practice for Sephirat HaOmer, Counting of the Omer through pairing it with a practice drawn from the intersection of authentic Kabbalah that accords with contemporary psychology and spiritual development.

The Kabbalists’ Omer practice is done based on a seven-week grid of seven of the ten qualities of what they called the Eitz Chayyim, the Tree of Life. The Tree is a mind map, a model, a metaphor for the source of life, and the mystery of the source of life manifesting as all that is apparent to us, including who we are and who we are becoming.

Three of the highest aspects, sephirot of the tree are not directly attainable. We can only conceive of them and at times experience the grace of the dimensions known as keter, “crown,” chochmah, “wisdom,” and binah, “understanding.” Refining the seven attainable aspects by combining them with each other and contemplating the new pair for each day is a powerful spiritual practice.

Omer Calendar for 2015 updated 4 14 15_Page_1

The practice transforms the 49 days into a very accessible spiritual journey that I highly recommend.

Many bloggers have taken up posting on the Kabbalists’ practice. For example, here is an excerpt from my daily omer blog on this practice for Day One of Forty-nine:

Walking in today’s omer state of consciousness, Lovingkindness within Lovingkindness, in Hebrew chessed sheh b’chessed, my sweet Hubbatzin Barry came upon a street sweeper pausing to help a very shaky homeless person write a sign asking for spare change.

Before the sun sets today there is still time for this Day One Omer practice — imagine being surrounded by more loving kindness than you have ever known, now allow yourself to fill with this glory, and express a prayer for this experience to untie your tangles, the ana b’koakh. Become radiant with this Love Song, know everything that lives is singing it, today, now, to you, each to all. Walk in the world, go out in this consciousness. Today has been Day One of the Omer.

My teacher, Rabbi Zalman, Schachter-Shalomi, of blessed memory, was certain that if all of us would undertake the innovative contemplative Omer path of the Kabbalists, that we would form a collective consciousness that would afford us the experience of synesthesia reported in the Torah.

All the people saw the sounds and the flashes, the sound of the shofar and the mountain smoking… (Exodus 20:14)

Reb Zalman hoped that from that precious point of consciousness, the metaphorical return to Sinai intended by Shavuot, we might bring down the needed new dimensions of Torah that can only be perceived as humans continue to evolve in the wilderness of our lives and times. So every year of our maturation as individuals, a people, and as a species, this is a valuable practice for the impact on our personal and collective lives.

A list of some of the many omer bloggers has been posted by ALEPH: Alliance for Jewish Renewal, a consortium of Jews from across the spectrum of Jewish life dedicated to the study and practice of Jewish life through the lens of serious scholarship and engaged spirituality.

This Passover, Don’t Forget Modern Slavery

Cartoon courtesy of Yaakov “Dry Bones” Kirscehn: http://drybonesblog.blogspot.co.il/

(NJDC) Today, countless American Seders are different from what some might consider “traditional.”

For example, today, many plates include an orange signifying the fruitfulness of all Jews, specifically women and members of the LGBT community. And, Elijah’s Cup no longer sits alone on a side table. It is accompanied by Miriam’s Cup, signifying the multitude of contributions women make to Jewish culture, past and present.

And, when we read the familiar, “And thou shalt tell thy son in that day, saying: It is because of that which the Lord did for me when I came forth out of Egypt.” (Ex. 13:8), many texts now include “thy daughter.”

The Exodus story told, artfully or otherwise, about the Israelites, being enslaved, and led out of Egypt by Moses, the revelations at Sinai, and the wanderings in the desert to the borders of Canaan, plays a part in the American Jewish community’s heartfelt displays of strong social activism, concerns for equality, and compassion for those less fortunate than others.

So, when we re-tell to our children and grandchildren the Exodus story, consider discussing a very real struggle of slavery: human trafficking. While today universal support for federal legislation addressing such atrocities exists, it is ensnared in the U.S. Senate.

Human trafficking, by all accounts, is a multi-billion dollar industry with perpetrators profiting from the control and exploitation of women, girls and young children, some of the most vulnerable members of society. And, it appears that some of our most familiar venues are not immune from being connected to it.

In fact, this form of modern slavery can be found during the Super Bowl, at motorcycle rallies in South Dakota, in the fields of Florida, in gangs in California, and in brothels in Washington, D.C. It is crucial that our community is aware of its broad reaching existence.

Victims of sex and labor trafficking need help and services throughout the year. Efforts to address this hideous crime never should be used a partisan wedge issue. To do so demeans us as a modern society.

The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, introduced by Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tx) creates a fund to help human trafficking victims by using fees charged to traffickers. It passed the Senate Judiciary Committee with bipartisan support. But, Democrats recently were exceedingly surprised to learn that the Hyde Amendment language, restricting federal funding for abortion and other health care services, was included: an outrageous trick that forces the entire bill to be stymied until the controversial language is removed.

Enter further inane GOP partisan action:  GOP leadership says that confirmation for President Obama’s stellar nominee for Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, will not move forward until the Cornyn bill is passed.  Coupled with the fact that relief for victims of human trafficking is no further along than it was a year ago, this situation illustrates just how partisan politics can harm, possibly irreparably damage, efforts of Tikkun Olam.

Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D., N.D.) and Susan Collins (R., Me) are working to route the bill, without the Hyde language, through the appropriations process. But, we must be mindful that the GOP very well could reinsert it.

We have much to which we relate this year when retelling the Exodus story. Modern slavery certainly can be one of the issues we address.

A version of this piece was originally published in the Washington Jewish Week.

Gefilte Is Not the Only Fish in Sea

Photo by David Keep

Photo by David Keep

Why do we always have to serve fish for Passover?

I get this question every year from the non-pescatarian participants in our Seder. They clearly do not share my childhood memories of preparing for the holiday of matzahs.

When I was a kid, purchasing and preparing the fish was an unforgettable experience. Serving fish during the Seder is a tradition that goes back to the Talmudic Era (70 BCE). At that time, fish was an affordable specialty that would elevate any celebration. No Passover or Shabbat table was considered complete without it.

My grandmother Devorah kept the traditions of her native Poland her whole life. Even though she had a perfectly good refrigerator in her kitchen in Israel, we would purchase a live carp on the day before the Seder. When we brought the fish home, our bathtub would be half filled with water. The carp was allowed to swim there, while the children played with it. Due to Israel’s water shortages, the fish was the only one who was ever allowed to take a bath! The rest of us very conscientiously showered, using the minimum amount of water necessary.

When the time came, my father would take his heaviest wrench, and slam the fish on the head, killing it with one blow. Then, he would slice it open, and remove its intestines and organs. He would fillet the fish, extricating the delicate flesh from the spine and skin. Carps have lots of tiny bones, so getting them all out was a lot of work. After rinsing the fish, he would hand-grind it. Now it was good enough for savta Devorah’s gefilte fish!

Despite all the jokes about gefilte fish, I have to admit that I loved hers. She mixed the freshly ground fish with chopped almonds, eggs, matzah meal, salt, black pepper and just a touch of sugar. She prepared a broth with fish heads she had purchased from the fishmonger, carrots and onions. The fish balls were poached in this broth. When they were ready, the delicate patties were removed from the broth with a slotted spoon. My savta would arrange them on a serving platter, decorating each with a carrot medallion from the pot. The broth was strained into a glass jar, and both the fish and the broth were refrigerated until the next day. After all the symbolic foods of the Seder were eaten, Shulchan Orech or “the festive meal” was announced. The first course to be served was the gefilte fish.

Savta Devorah’s gefilte fish would have been very familiar to the Jewish housewives of New York’s Lower East Side at the beginning of the 20th century. Because the bulk of Jewish immigrants came to the United States from Eastern Europe, American Jews immediately associate Passover with gefilte fish.

Ashkenazi Jews do not have a monopoly over the consumption of fish during the Seder. This Passover, you can be adventurous by trying fish recipes from different Jewish communities around the world.

For something exotic, you may experiment with the flavors of the Jewish community of Bombay. Merchant traders from Baghdad founded this community about 250 years ago. They adopted the foods of India, and added influences from Arabia, Turkey, and Persia. Here is a recipe for sardina, a fish served cold for Shabbat and Passover. You may prepare it a day or two in advance, and keep it ready to serve in the refrigerator.

Sardinaphoto (17)

Adapted from “Indian-Jewish Cooking” by Mavis Hyman.

  • 2 lbs. fish fillet
  • curry powder
  • olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon tamarind concentrate
  • 2 mangoes, diced
  • 1 bunch scallion, chopped
  • 1 chili pepper, thinly sliced
  • salt
  • cashew nuts, shelled and toasted
  1. Sprinkle some curry powder and salt over the fish fillets.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a heavy frying pan.
  3. Fry the fish on both sides until it flakes easily.
  4. Place the fish in a large bowl, and allow it to cool to room temperature.
  5. Flake the fish with a fork.
  6. Mix in the mangoes, scallions, tamarind concentrate, and chili pepper.
  7. Adjust the seasoning.
  8. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
  9. Serve cold, garnished with cashew nuts.

One of the most ancient Jewish communities in the world is in Georgia, in the Caucasus. The Jews fled to Georgia during the Babylonian Exile, in the sixth Century BCE. Georgia is blessed with a mild climate and rich soil. Fruits, vegetables, and nuts grow abundantly, and are featured in Georgian cuisine. One of the most popular ways of preparing fish in Georgia is with a rich walnut sauce. It is served cold, garnished with pomegranate seeds.

Fish Satsivi

Adapted from Georgian Cuisine by T. Sulakvelidze.

  • lb. fish fillet
  • 1 cup shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup wine vinegar
  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. ground clove
  • 1/2 tsp. ground coriander
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 whole allspice berries
  • saffron
  • salt
  • dry chili pepper
  • ground black pepper
  • Khmeli-Suneli Georgian spice mix (optional)photo (15)
  • pomegranate seeds
  1. Place the fish fillets in a heavy pot. Cover them with cold water.
  2. Add the bay leaves and allspice berries.
  3. Bring the pot to a boil, and then simmer for 45 minutes.
  4. Remove the fish with a slotted spoon to a casserole dish.
  5. Place the walnuts, garlic, chili pepper, saffron, ground coriander and salt in a food processor.
  6. Grind the nut mixture.
  7. Empty the nut paste into a pot.
  8. Add just enough fish broth to get a creamy consistency.
  9. Add the chopped onions.
  10. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for 10 minutes.
  11. Add the vinegar, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper and Khmeli-Suneli.
  12. Simmer for an additional 10 minutes.
  13. Pour the sauce over the fish.
  14. Cover the casserole dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
  15. Serve cold, garnished with fresh pomegranate seeds.

The Les Misérables Special You Will Only See On Passover!

The Maccabeats sing the story of Passover in a perfectly adapted medley based on Les Miserables.

“Look down, look down. You’ll always be a slave…” Wait for the grand finale as they continue with “Do you hear the people sing? Say do you hear the distant drums, It is future that they bring when tomorrow comes.” The Maccabeats are unbeatabe on their new album – One Day More. Just sit back and enjoy!

Green Passover Salad


Green Salad by Marisa McClellan.
© Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

— by Abby Contract

After many months of gloomy weather and eating winter offerings of potatoes and cabbage, I am ready to welcome my spring crop of fresh herbs.  I am especially excited to see the first shoots of dill.  Dill originated in Eastern Europe, and has a high tolerance for cold weather.  This healthy, aromatic herb is high in iron, calcium, and fiber.  It is a very popular addition to salads in Eastern Europe.

For the first Seder dinner, I’ll include the dill in an amazingly refreshing Spring Green Salad which combats the heaviness of brisket, potato kugel and the multiple pieces of matzoh. I’ve made this salad, which has the right balance of crunch and tanginess, for years. It reminds me of a good friend who happens to always be open to new experiences, encouraging others to join in on the fun. And, that’s what Passover should be about – a surprising and ever-changing blend of history, tradition, novelty, openness and joy.

Recipe follows the jump.
Spring Green Salad
Serves 6

  • 16 cups of washed and torn romaine lettuce
  • 1 English cucumber, julienned
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup of minced fresh dill
  • 1/2 cup of olive oil
  • 6 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice
  • 2 garlic cloves pressed
  1. Combine lettuce, cucumbers, green onions, and dill in large bowl.
  2. Whisk olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic in small bowl until blended. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Pour dressing over salad. Toss until evenly coated and serve. Enjoy!

Abby Contract is the creator of Phoodistory, a celebration of Philly’s fanatical history with food.

JSPAN Issues Haggadah Supplement for 2014

Though the goal of absolute equality may be impossible to realize, we learn from Yachatz that is it incumbant upon us to strive for equality.

The Jewish Social Policy Action Network has released its annual Haggadah Supplement for 2014, titled A Passage to Equality. The theme is overcoming inequality of opportunity.

Assembled and edited by three lawyers — Stephen Sussman, Jeffrey Pasek and Ken Myers — the Supplement addresses the Passover as a passage from slavery to equality, and seeks to provide additional relevance to the story with modern prayers and readings. The readings take up the meaning of Zdakah, how we address poverty and economic inequality as a society, women’s rights issues, and other modern conditions that impact lives. The Haggadah Supplement provides fresh ideas and opportunities for discussion during the Seder.

The Supplement is a 12-page booklet, including photos. Download it as a pdf file for viewing or printing.

Links to JSPAN’s previous issue oriented Haggadah supplements follow the jump.

 
Each year, the Jewish Social Policy Action Network develops issue oriented material each year you can use to enrich your seder. Supplements to the traditional Haggadah relate the biblical story of the Exodus to current events and issues.

  • The 2013 Haggadah Supplement is entitled Welcoming the Stranger to the Land. We were immigrants in Egypt.  And we have been immigrants many times since then, until we achieved citizenship on American soil. The Seder is a time to reflect on our experience and the plight of others who have not yet achieved their freedoms here.
  • The 2012 Freedom Supplement celebrates emerging freedom movements around the world with poems, texts and prayers. Editors Stephen C. Sussman Esq. and Kenneth R. Myers Esq. have drawn from far-ranging sources, from Lord Byron to Tibet. Each of the readings includes suggestions keying it into the traditional Seder service.
  • In 2011 the JSPAN Supplement, This is the bread of poverty, brought the focus to hunger here and around the world. The 2012 “Freedom Seder” takes up the human longing for freedom that is spreading around the globe, and concludes with four resolutions that we as American Jews can meaningfully adopt.
  • In 2010 JSPAN released its first Supplement, entitled We were strangers, on the theme of immigration in history and in the United States.

Passover: Haroset Leftover Heaven

— by Ronit Treatman

Haroset, the fruit and nut paste symbolizing mortar, has a cameo role in the Passover Seder.  This is usually the first and last time that it is consumed all year.  I am very enthusiastic about preparing home-made haroset.  I make a Sephardic, an Ashkenazi and another haroset for the Seder.  I always end up with way too much.  In order to make use of my leftovers, I have found that it is possible to create a whole meal around haroset.

More after the jump.
African DinnerThe appetizer course is a cheese platter, served with Indian halek (walnuts with date syrup) and matzo crackers.  The haroset complements many types of cheeses such as goat cheese, sharp cheddar, and blue cheese perfectly.  

A wonderful main course that incorporates haroset is a Moroccan tagine.  Tagine is meat or chicken that is slowly braised with dry fruits and nuts.  Adding the haroset just cuts back on a few steps when preparing your tagine.  

Chicken, Beef or Lamb Haroset Tagine

  • 2 pounds of chicken, beef or lamb cubes
  • 2 medium onions, diced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup Sephardic haroset
  • 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ras El Hanout
  • 1/2 cup minced cilantro
  1. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add the meat, onion, garlic, and spices.
  3. Fry over medium heat until the meat browns.
  4. Add 2 ½ cups water and bring to a boil.
  5. Add the cilantro.
  6. Cover the pot tightly, and simmer for 2 ½ hours.

To serve:

  1. Heat the haroset in a microwave safe glass bowl for 3 minutes.
  2. Place the meat on a large serving platter.
  3. Spoon the haroset over the meat.

Such a stellar main dish requires something really special to be a fitting dessert.  A haroset Souffle is up to the task, inspired by the traditional French dessert.

Haroset Soufflé

  • 1 cup haroset
  • 4 egg whites
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Vegetable oil
  • Powdered sugar
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F
  2. Whip the egg whites and sugar until stiff and smooth.
  3. Fold in the haroset.
  4. Coat the inside of soufflé ramekins with vegetable oil.
  5. Pour the batter inside the cups.
  6. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes.
  7. Remove the soufflés, and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
  8. Serve immediately.

Cookbook Review: 4 Bloggers Dish: Passover

When food bloggers become friends, it can lead to an interesting collaboration.

4 Bloggers Dish: Passover: Modern Twists on Traditional Flavors is a wonderful compilation of creative kosher recipes from four women who befriended each other in cyberspace. If you are hoping to freshen up your Seder with bright, healthy, and creative recipes, this book is for you.

Whitney Fisch was a model in Milan when she discovered the pleasures of Italian food. Her website, Jewhungry, relates how she keeps kosher while trying everything.

Liz Rueven shares her kosher vegetarian adventures in Kosher Like Me. I especially admire her thorough research and travel adventures.

Amy Kritzer, the creator of What Jew Wanna Eat, started by preserving her bubby’s recipes. From there, she fell in love with cooking and attended the Cordon Bleu Cooking School in Austin, Texas. She shares both vintage and new recipes.

More after the jump.
Sarah Lasry, creator of The Patchke Princess (the fussy princess), is a chef, owner of Tastebuds Cafe, and cookbook author. She is renown for her creative kosher gourmet cooking.

4 Bloggers Dish: Passover: Modern Twists on Traditional Flavors includes step-by-step instructions and beautiful visuals. It offers helpful tips, such as freezer instructions, prep-ahead rules, and a to-go Guide. This book features recipes such as balsamic-braised short ribs, matzah brie caprese, spaghetti squash with quinoa meatballs, sautéed kale, tomato, and mushroom quiche with a hash brown crust, and cinnamon donut balls.

You may try out their recipe for vegetable frittatine, for Passover. Liz Rueven encourages her readers to use greens such as kale and spinach from their local farmers’ market. These greens pair especially well with sautéed mushrooms and onions. Personally, I preferred minced cilantro and low-fat cheddar. I served it with spicy Mexican salsa.

Vegetable Frittatine (Crustless quiche in individual portions)

Dairy, Non-Gebrokts (soaked matza)
Prep Time: 20 minutes; Bake time: 25 minutes
Makes approximately 12 mini frittate in muffin tins.

Ingredients:

  • Canola oil cooking spray
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 eggs, beaten
  • 4 tablespoons milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons fresh herbs of choice, chopped (dill, parsley, cilantro, basil)
  • A few twists of freshly ground pepper
  • 5 oz. crumbled feta or goat cheese, or cheese of choice (shredded or crumbled)
  • 1 onion, chopped finely
  • 6 oz. mushrooms, washed and chopped and/or one red (or orange) pepper, chopped finely
  • One generous bunch or one 5-oz. bag of organic spinach or kale, washed and rough-chopped

Instructions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350˚F with oven rack in middle.
  2. Spray muffin tin with canola oil.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk eggs with milk. Add salt, pepper and herbs.
  4. Add cheese and mix well. Set aside.
  5. Heat olive oil in large pan.
  6. Add onion and sauté until translucent.
  7. Add mushrooms and/or peppers and sauté until soft.
  8. Add greens and toss until wilted.
  9. Drain pan of any liquid that has accumulated (save for soup stock).
  10. Cool for 5-10 minutes. Add the vegetables to the egg mixture in large bowl. Mix to integrate well.
  11. Spoon 2 tablespoon of mixture into each opening in muffin tin. Mix periodically so that ingredients are distributed evenly.
  12. Bake for 20-25 minutes until frittatine are set and tops are golden.
  13. Remove from oven and allow pan to cool for 10 minutes. Using a small spatula or a tablespoon, gently remove individual frittate from tin and serve.

Tips:

  • Serve Immediately: Because these are really mini soufflés, they are puffy and light when served immediately. If not, they do “fall” but they retain their basic shape and are still delicious. I use them as a protein-rich addition to brunch or as a light dinner with salad and soup.
  • Take to Go:  They make a convenient afternoon snack and a satisfying lunch to go. They are solid enough to pack in Ziploc bags and take along for day trips or school lunches.
  • Freezer: They freeze well in a Ziploc bag. Take them out of the freezer in advance and reheat, gently, in microwave or in oven at 325F for 10-15 minutes or until warmed through. I like them at room temp, too.

Easy Passover Cake Three Ways

— by Ronit Treatman

Passover is a time of visiting with family and friends, as well as entertaining.

It is easier than you think to make a delicious home-baked dessert to sweeten these encounters: All you need is a torte to form the base, freshly whipped heavy cream, melted chocolate, nuts, and spring berries.

In my family, these cakes were rolled, with the filling on the inside. Something always goes wrong when I try this, so I just serve them like strawberry shortcakes.

Recipes follow the jump.
For all of these cakes, preheat the oven to 350°F, and oil a 9-inch round cake pan. Note that peanuts, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds are kitniyot.

Nut Cake

  • 2 3/4 cups toasted and ground walnuts, almonds, pistachios, pecans, hazelnuts, pine nuts, cashews, Macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, or coconut.
  • 1/2 cup cane sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 7 eggs, separated
  1. Place the ground nuts, brown sugar, and salt in a bowl. Mix well.
  2. In a separate bowl, whip the egg yolks and the cane sugar for about 5 minutes.
  3. When the egg mixture is fluffy, fold it into the nut mixture.
  4. In a clean bowl, whip the egg whites.
  5. Fold 1/3 of the egg whites into the egg yolk mixture.
  6. Fold the rest of the egg whites into the batter.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan.
  8. Bake for 60 minutes.
  9. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

Sponge Cake

  • 1/4 cup matzo meal
  • 2 tablespoons potato flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 8 eggs, separated
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  1. Whip the egg yolks, orange zest, and 1 cup of sugar in a bowl.
  2. In a different bowl, whip the egg whites with 1/2 cup of sugar.
  3. Add the matzo meal, potato flour, and orange juice to the yolk mixture.
  4. Fold 1/3 of the egg whites into the yolk batter.
  5. Fold the rest of the egg whites into the batter.
  6. Pour the batter into a prepared cake pan.
  7. Bake for 70 minutes.
  8. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.


Photo by Tim Sackton. Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic.

Chocolate Cake

  • 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2 cups ground almonds (or other nut of your choice)
  • 7/8 cup sugar
  • 10 eggs, separated
  1. Melt the chocolate chips in the microwave.
  2. Whip the yolks and sugar in a large bowl.
  3. Add the melted chocolate and ground almonds.
  4. Whip the egg whites in a separate bowl.
  5. Fold the egg whites into the chocolate mixture.
  6. Pour the batter into a prepared pan.
  7. Bake for 60 minutes.
  8. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool.

All of these cakes are delicious unadorned, and pair very well with coffee or tea. However, you can have fun garnishing them. Here are some easy ideas you may use separately or together:

Whipped Cream

  • heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon brandy
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • nuts
  1. Whip the cream with the sugar and brandy.
  2. Spread the whipped cream over the cake.
  3. Sprinkle some nuts over the cream.

Alternatively, you can sprinkle some powdered sugar over your cake, melt some chocolate chips in the microwave and spread the melted chocolate over it, or garnish it with fresh spring berries.